Notes on Lilienthal-Capablanca, Hastings 1934-35

Notes on Lilienthal-Capablanca, Hastings 1934-35

Andor Lilienthal’s queen sacrifice is too well-known to go into detail with here, but the stories surrounding the game are quite interesting. First the game: Andor Lilienthal – José Raúl Capablanca Hastings, 1 January 1935 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. a3 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3 b6 6. f3 d5 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 Ba6 …

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Caricatures from Haifa 1976

Caricatures from Haifa 1976

The daily bulletin of the 1976 Chess Olympiad in Haifa was pretty bare-boned. It had little besides games and results, but occasionally a caricature broke the monotony. Here follows a collection of the best and most interesting sketches.

Bogoljubow’s psychological trick

Bogoljubow’s psychological trick

From Prager Tagblatt, 13 August 1933: Played in the 15th and last round of the German Championship on 11 July 1933 at Bad Pyrmont. Jakob Adolf Seitz – Efim Bogoljubow Notes by Seitz 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 b5 Half Indian, half Polish. Sämisch played like this against Thomas at the 1925 Marienbad tournament. 3. a4 …

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B. H. Wood on Alekhine

B. H. Wood on Alekhine

Baruch H. Wood (1909-1989) is mainly known as publisher and editor of Chess for more than 50 years. But he also wrote an interesting weekly column for Illustrated London News from 1949 to 1979. This is a collection of Wood’s recollections and observations on Alexander Alekhine and his personality from Illustrated London News. Alekhine loses Alekhine …

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Alekhine and the man who stares

Alekhine and the man who stares

The Portuguese champion Francisco Lupi told a bizarre story in Chess, April 1947: We arrived at Cáceres, a little Spanish town, Dr. Alekhine and I, at the beginning of December, 1945. We were strolling down a road, when he suddenly stopped as if he had seen a demon: “I’m done for!” he said, “It is …

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The state of chess in Paris

The state of chess in Paris

By Robert John Buckley Rosenthal has held the field in Paris for many years, but his star is waning. Taubenhaus and Goetz are now in possession, and de Riviére is more to the fore than ever. There has been a great split among the Parisian chessists, and an opposition room is now running in the …

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Chess in 1918: Rubinstein-Schlechter

Chess in 1918: Rubinstein-Schlechter

In his chess column in Allgemeine Sport-Zeitung (January 13 1918) Schlechter announced that he was to play a match against Rubinstein: At the end of Januar Schlechter and Rubinstein will play a small match at Kerkaupalast in Berlin. The match will begin on January 19 [the first game was in fact played on the 21st. …

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A Chat with Zukertort

A Chat with Zukertort

From The Salt Lake Herald, June 28, 1884: Zukertort The World’s Champion Chess Player Here. A Herald reporter found the great chess player at the Walker House yesterday afternoon, and had a very pleasant chat with him on chess, and on matters in general. Dr. Zukertort is not only the greatest chess player living, but …

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Lasker on Capablanca: San Sebastián 1911

Lasker on Capablanca: San Sebastián 1911

Emanuel Lasker annotated 7 of Capablanca’s games from San Sebastián 1911 for his chess column in The Louisville Courier-Journal in the period March 26 – April 30 1911: Frank J. Marshall – José Raúl Capablanca Round 2, February 21 1911 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. cxd5 The exchange balances the position, whereas white should retain …

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The Death and Burial of Paul Morphy

The Death and Burial of Paul Morphy

Death Yesterday afternoon, at 2:30 o’clock, Paul Morphy, the great chess player, died suddenly at the residence of his mother, on Royal street, between Conti and St. Louis. As shortly before his demise he had been met on the street, apparently in good health, the news startled those who knew him. Inquiries as to the …

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